What’s trackback

Trackback is a means for one Web page to let another Web page know that it’s been linked to. If that sounds simple but confusing, here’s an example usage.

Let’s say Wendy writes a post on her Web site and enables Trackbacks** on that post. In essence, what Wendy has done is said, “ok, I’ve said something and now I’m listening.”

Fred reads Wendy’s post. He writes a post on his site that links to Wendy’s post. Fred can then send Wendy’s post a Trackback ping that contains information about Fred’s post. In essence, Fred is saying, “hey Wendy, I heard what you said and here’s my response.”

Since it is Trackback-enabled, Wendy’s post is then modified to include a link to Fred’s response. In this way, Wendy can aggregate responses to her post, people who have read Wendy’s post have a way of letting her know they’ve responded, and anyone who reads Wendy’s post can click through and read those responses.

There are a few more options that complicate matters (I’ve left out those details), but that’s the gist of Trackback.

From kottke.com

Advertisements

0 Responses to “What’s trackback”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Proudly sponsored by

What’s up in my life?

1. Best friends: I love you people.
2. My own company: sky media
3. Science is so very cool
4. 6 month sabbatical.

Visitors

Ads

My del.icio.us

My little bro's pics

thetigre

the village of the monster

zxcde

More Photos

RSS Seed Magazine Focus

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

RSS Seed Magazine News

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Khalil A. Cassimally’s blog


%d bloggers like this: